Adderall and Vyvanse are both stimulants proven to be useful for ADHD and ADD. However, they differ in their mechanisms of action and the effects can vary amongst individuals. Read on to see if Adderall or Vyvanse is right for you.

Disclaimer: We are in no way, shape, or form encouraging or condoning the use of non-prescribed Adderall or Vyvanse use. The following article is solely designed to increase safety and knowledge surrounding the drugs.

Introduction

Adderall (dextroamphetamine-amphetamine) and Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine) both belong to a class of drug called amphetamines. They are both stimulants that have been proven to be helpful for ADHD and ADD [R, R, R].

Amphetamines act on your nervous system to increase levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin [R, R].

Stimulants such as Adderall and Vyvanse are often the first-line treatments for ADHD and ADD [R, R, R].

American adults who take Adderall for ADHD have increased 90% from 2002 to 2005. Vyvanse is not as common but was approved for use in children in 2007, in adults in 2008, and in adolescents in 2010 [R, R, R].

Increased use can cause addiction and abuse. Stimulants have become the second most-misused/abused drug by college students. This stems from a belief that stimulants like Adderall are “harmless” [R, R, R].

Adderall is also used for narcolepsy and decreasing hyperactivity while Vyvanse is used for binge eating disorder [R, R, R].

Both Adderall and Vyvanse are Schedule II drugs, meaning they pose a high risk of abuse that may lead to physical and psychological dependence [R].

Components

Adderall and Vyvanse differ in their amphetamine composition. Adderall is composed of [R]:

  • Dextroamphetamine (d-amphetamine) saccharate
  • D-amphetamine sulfate
  • Levoamphetamine (l-amphetamine) sulfate
  • L-amphetamine aspartate

D- and l-amphetamine are mirror images of each other. Adderall contains both molecules as the body processes the two differently, and when used together, this increases effectiveness [R, R].

Vyvanse is only made up of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate. It is also classified as a prodrug, meaning that it does not enter the body like a drug, but is transformed into one once inside. It becomes converted to d-amphetamine, one of the components of Adderall [R].

Technical Absorption Characteristics

The time of maximum concentration (Tmax) of Vyvanse in the body is 1 hour. Tmax of d-amphetamine after converting from Vyvanse is 3.5 hours*. The Tmax tells the user when the drug will reach its maximal effect [R].

However, in a study (DB-RCT) of 50 children with ADHD, the Tmax of d-amphetamine (from Vyvanse) was closer to 5 hours [R].

In the same study, the Tmax of d-amphetamine from extended-release Adderall pills (Adderall XR) was 6.6 hours. The Tmax values varied 3.5 times more for Adderall than Vyvanse. The fluctuating absorption characteristics of Adderall makes Vyvanse more predictable and easier to use [R, R].

Cell and rodent studies found that Vyvanse was absorbed in the small intestine, and is converted to d-amphetamine by red blood cells. The conversion happens through a process called enzymatic hydrolysis, which is the breakdown of a molecule with water and the help of an enzyme* [R, R].

*According to Shire Pharmaceuticals, the makers of Vyvanse and Adderall XR.

Mechanisms of Action

Adderall and Vyvanse are nervous system stimulants. They cause the release of norepinephrine by stimulating α- and β-adrenergic receptor sites. Adrenergic receptors are those that specifically release neurotransmitters noradrenaline or adrenaline [R, R].

Stimulating the α-adrenergic receptor sites causes [R]:

  • Constriction of blood vessels all over the body

Stimulating the β-adrenergic receptor sites increases [R]:

  • Heart rate
  • Muscle blood flow
  • The output of blood from the heart

All of these effects help to stimulate the brain into a more active state [R].

Amphetamines also release adrenaline in the body, which results in increased energy levels [R].

In a study (DB-RCT) of 16 volunteers, d-amphetamine was 2 times more effective than l-amphetamine in increasing euphoric mood. Depression following amphetamine use was higher with l-amphetamine [R].

Rat studies show that d-amphetamine was better for improving overactivity and impulsiveness while l-amphetamine was more successful in improving sustained attention. Therefore, Vyvanse, which only increases d-amphetamine concentrations, may not be used for improving sustained attention [R].

Adderall and Vyvanse both prevent neurotransmitters from being taken up, broken down, and stored inside neurons. This is achieved by blocking transporters that bring molecules from the outside of the cell to the inside of the cell. Specifically, Adderall blocks [R, R]:

  • The dopamine reuptake transporter: It increases dopamine concentrations outside of the cell
  • The noradrenaline reuptake transporter: It increases noradrenaline concentrations outside of the cell

This results in increased activity at the next cell, which is why it is referred to as a stimulant [R, R].

Amphetamines also prevent the storage of dopamine in compartments within the cell (vesicles). This increases the availability of dopamine for later use [R].

Adderall inhibits the activity of proteins that break down dopamine (monoamine oxidase A and B), which further increases the amount of dopamine available for use in the brain [R].

*According to Shire Pharmaceuticals, the makers of Vyvanse.

Shared Uses of Adderall and Vyvanse

1) Adderall and Vyvanse Improve ADHD and ADD

Adderall is one of the most commonly prescribed stimulants for ADHD. A study (DB-RCT) of 154 children found that Adderall was effective in 89% of children [R, R].

Vyvanse is also widely used and was effective in 74% of children with ADHD, based on a study (DB-RCT) of 52 children. The same study also tested Adderall, but only found a 72% effective rate [R].

In the same study (DB-RCT) of 52 children, both Adderall and Vyvanse treated ADHD better than placebo. The SKAMP rating scale, which measures ADHD symptoms in the classroom, was equivalent in both Adderall and Vyvanse. Math scores improved slightly more with Adderall than Vyvanse [R].

On the other hand, symptom severity improved better in Vyvanse. Studies reported 32% of children were “very much improved” with Vyvanse compared to the 16% with Adderall. However, 56% were “much improved” with Adderall compared to 42% with Vyvanse. The rate of side effects was similar in both groups [R].

Therefore, Vyvanse may improve symptoms better in some children, but Adderall has a wider range of efficacy. This could be due to the mix of amphetamines in Adderall compared to the sole d-amphetamine in Vyvanse.

Adderall is only used for short-term management of ADHD in adults. Long-term use in adults/adolescents has not been proven to be helpful. However, Vyvanse has been shown to be effective long-term in a study (RCT) of 349 adults with ADHD. [R, R, R].

2) Adderall and Vyvanse Increase Focus

Most people that use Adderall or Vyvanse medically use it to increase focus due to conditions such as ADHD or ADD. Vyvanse may be more useful for adults in workplace settings as the drug’s effects can last up to 14 hours with 1 dose while still being safe and tolerable [R, R].

The duration of Adderall’s effects is dependent on the type of Adderall taken (extended release or instant release), but it can also potentially last up to 12 hours [R].

3) Adderall and Vyvanse Increase Energy Levels

In a study (DB-RCT) of 12 adults, d-amphetamine, a product of both Vyvanse and Adderall, was better than placebo at increasing energy levels [R].

However, in rats, d-amphetamine decreased the production of the following energy molecules in the brain [R]:

  • Glycogen
  • Adenosine triphosphate (only at temperatures > 80.6℉)
  • Guanosine triphosphate (only at temperatures > 80.6℉)
  • Phosphocreatine (only at temperatures > 80.6℉)

These effects were only seen with ambient temperatures greater than 80.6℉ [R].

D-amphetamine only makes up a portion of Adderall, so it is not a completely accurate representation of Adderall’s effects in increasing energy. However, one can expect these effects following Vyvanse ingestion.

Fatigue can occur following withdrawal from amphetamine use, causing users to re-ingest amphetamine for increased energy [R].

4) Adderall and Vyvanse May Cause Weight Loss

Before Adderall was used for ADHD, it was prescribed to help reduce weight by decreasing appetite. It is not advised to reduce weight using Vyvanse, although this effect can be seen in 9.2 to 21.9% of children [R, R].

Although Adderall-induced weight loss is usually not severe, it may lead to anorexia. A study (DB-RCT) of 584 children found that anorexia occurred in 21.9% of the children. Similarly, a study (DB-RCT) of 287 teens found anorexia to occur in 35.6% of patients [R, R, R].

In a study of 259 adults with binge eating disorder, Vyvanse caused 10.8 lbs. of weight loss by the end of the 11-week study. However, the studies were not long-term and mainly done in women. Therefore, extrapolating these findings to the greater population may be unwarranted [R].

In some rare cases, Adderall may actually cause weight gain. A case study of an 11-year old boy saw Adderall use increase the boy’s weight by 8.8 lbs. in 6 weeks. Changing the timing of Adderall consumption from right after meals to 45 minutes before meals helped to normalize weight gain [R].

5) Adderall and Vyvanse Increase Impulse Control

Adderall helps to improve impulse control by decreasing hyperactivity [R, R].

One of the main subtypes of ADHD is ADHD with combined inattentive/hyperactive-impulsivity [R, R].

A study (DB-RCT) of 287 adolescents found that Adderall significantly improved hyperactivity/impulsivity in these patients [R, R].

Improving impulse control can also help decrease weight. In a study (DB-RCT) of 259 adults with binge eating disorder (BED), 50 and 70 mg Vyvanse led to 10.8 lbs. weight loss in BED patients by decreasing impulsive behavior to binge eat [R].

A study (DB-RCT) of 56 ADHD patients given Adderall also caused weight loss by decreasing impulsivity [R].

Different Uses of Adderall and Vyvanse

Some uses of Adderall that have not been approved for Vyvanse include [R, R]:

  • Narcolepsy
  • Hyperactivity (in those with ADHD)

Narcolepsy is a disorder that causes extreme daytime drowsiness. A form of Adderall, Adderall XR, is preferred, as it works for longer periods of time and has a lower potential for abuse [R].

In a study (RCT) of 18 children suffering from hyperactivity and aggression, Adderall decreased symptoms in 14 of the children [R].

Some uses of Vyvanse that have not been approved for Adderall include [R, R]:

  • Improving driving (in those with ADHD)
  • Binge eating disorder (BED)

In a study (RCT) of 61 ADHD patients, Vyvanse produced fewer accidents and faster reaction times than placebo in driving simulations [R].

On the other hand, Adderall may worsen driving performance as seen in a study (SB-RCT) of 25 volunteers. Studies of ADHD drivers given Adderall need to be accomplished [R].

Vyvanse is the only medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for binge eating disorder (BED). In a study (DB-RCT) of 259 BED adults, 70 mg Vyvanse decreased binge eating episodes from 4.6/week to 0.5/week [R].

Rat studies show that Vyvanse decreased chocolate binge eating by 71%. It is hypothesized that Vyvanse inhibits the removal of dopamine and norepinephrine and concurrently promotes the release of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. These neurotransmitters are heavily involved in regulating eating behaviors [R, R, R, R].

Adderall and Vyvanse Misuse/Abuse

In a survey of non-prescription stimulant student users, 93.5% used stimulants to increase focus when studying [R].

Students who misuse/abuse these amphetamine stimulants report [R]:

  • Improvements in mood
  • Motivation to work
  • Less time needed to accomplish tasks
  • Increased physical and mental energy

A survey of 10,000 patients found that Vyvanse was abused at lower rates than both extended and immediate release Adderall [R].

Surveys of stimulant abusers have found that Vyvanse generally is not liked, leading to less potential for abuse. In fact, Vyvanse was liked even less than placebo, which is uncommon for euphoria-producing drugs. The euphoric effects of Vyvanse are lower due to the time it takes to convert to d-amphetamine [R, R].

Abuse of amphetamines can cause psychosis, heart attack, diseased heart muscle, and even sudden death. They can also cause long-term increases in heart rate and short-term increases in blood pressure [R].

Adderall use can cause dependence, which can then lead to withdrawal symptoms when medication is ceased. Withdrawal can lead to [R]

Vyvanse produces fewer withdrawal symptoms due to people generally abusing the drug less [R, R].

Side Effects

The most common side effects in both Adderall and Vyvanse include [R, R, R, R]:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Dizziness
  • Dry mouth
  • Irritability/agitation
  • Stomach pain
  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Weight loss (weight loss can be countered through other medications such as cyproheptadine or through a higher caloric diet) [R]
  • Anxiety
  • A headache
  • Insomnia
  • Increased heart rate

If these symptoms occur after taking Adderall or Vyvanse, contact your doctor immediately [R, R, R, R]:

  • Seizures (convulsions)
  • Changes in vision or blurred vision
  • Allergic reactions (symptoms can include itching or hives, swelling in the mouth, face, or hands, difficulty breathing, feeling like you are about to pass out, or tightness in the chest)
  • Fever or sweating
  • Muscle problems, such as spasms or twitching
  • Hallucinations (visual and auditory)
  • Fainting
  • Unusual mood or behavior
  • Signs of heart problems (can be fast, slow, or uneven heartbeats)
  • Signs of circulation problems (unexplained bruises, numbness, cold, color changes, or pain in fingers or toes)

Adderall may decrease short-term memory [R].

It may also lead to antisocial feelings, keeping users from enjoying or participating in interactions with others [R].

Some of the mental side effects of amphetamine use occur due to too much dopamine in the brain. In a study of 14 patients, 12 patients dependant on amphetamines developed psychosis. This brought about schizophrenic-like paranoia and intense hallucinations [R, R].

Adderall use by athletes may be dangerous as it increases body temperatures, which may cause heat stress. It is especially dangerous during exercise for long periods of time because it is easy to miss the symptoms of exhaustion and fatigue [R].

Use of stimulants can also stunt growth. A long-term study of 281 children taking Vyvanse found that, on average, height decreased by 13%. However, discontinuing treatment can possibly lead to a growth “rebound” [R, R].

Adderall and Vyvanse May Increase Your Risk of Heart Problems

One of the most dangerous side effects of both Adderall and Vyvanse can be a heart attack or stroke. Patients with a personal or family history of heart conditions are at a higher risk of developing such complications [R, R, R].

The heart problems can be due to changes in heart rate and blood pressure that are seen following Adderall or Vyvanse consumption. On average, Adderall increases heart rate 1 to 2 beats per minute (bpm). As the dose is increased, heart rate increases respectively [R, R, R].

In a study (RCT) of 111 children with ADHD, Vyvanse increased heart rate by up to 6.6 bpm. The average blood pressure also rose by up to 4 mmHg [R].

Patients should be checked for circulatory issues before starting Vyvanse or Adderall [R, R].

Although rare, combining alcohol and Adderall may lead to a heart attack [R, R].

Limitations and Caveats

It is difficult to say for certain which stimulant is better: Adderall or Vyvanse. There are not many studies studying the two drugs in comparison. When compared, Adderall is better for some symptoms and situations and Vyvanse is better in others [R, R, R].

Furthermore, many of the clinical trials are performed on healthy people, which is not what one would see in regular practice. The limited number of long-term studies and the number of patients in the studies also makes it difficult to find rare adverse events [R].

Vyvanse has not been proven to be safe and effective for children ages 3 to 5 [R].

Drug Interactions

Adderall release is dependent on the acidity of the stomach. In a study of 24 healthy adults, when Adderall was given with omeprazole (reduces stomach acid), Tmax of Adderall decreased by 2.25 hours. The Tmax of Vyvanse in response to omeprazole did not change, suggesting that Vyvanse is not affected by changes in acidity [R].

Because Vyvanse is unaffected by pH changes, it has fewer drug-drug interactions [R].

However, the following Adderall drug interactions may also apply to Vyvanse. Please tell your doctor about all drugs, medicines, supplements, etc. you are taking before taking Adderall or Vyvanse [R]:

  • Acetazolamide
  • Ammonium chloride
  • Buspirone
  • Chlorpromazine
  • Ethosuximide
  • Fentanyl
  • Glutamic acid
  • Guanethidine
  • Haloperidol
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Lithium
  • Meperidine
  • Methenamine
  • Phenobarbital
  • Phenytoin
  • Propoxyphene
  • Quinidine
  • Reserpine
  • Ritonavir
  • Sodium acid phosphate
  • St. John’s Wort
  • Tramadol
  • Tryptophan supplements
  • Allergy medicine
  • Antacids
  • Cimetidine
  • Esomeprazole
  • Omeprazole
  • Pantoprazole
  • Sodium bicarbonate
  • Blood pressure medications
  • Desipramine
  • Fluoxetine
  • Paroxetine
  • Protriptyline
  • Migraine medications
  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitors

Dosage

The different doses of Adderall sold are 5 mg, 10 mg, 15 mg, 20 mg, and 30 mg. They may be in tablet form or the extended release form. Extended-release tablets are labeled Adderall XR while instant release tablets are labeled Adderall IR [R].

A 70 mg dose of Vyvanse is therapeutically equivalent to a 30mg Adderall XR tablet [R].

Vyvanse is a long-acting pill. To achieve long-term duration, Adderall XR must be taken instead of Adderall IR [R].

In a study (RCT) of 18 adult volunteers, taking Vyvanse in capsule form or as a solution did not change the exposure to the drug. Eating food did not alter the exposure either except for high-fat meals, which prolonged the exposure by around one hour [R, R].

Taking vitamin C or juices high in vitamin C may decrease the effectiveness of Adderall [R].

For children who have trouble swallowing pills, opening the Vyvanse capsule and dissolving the contents in water may be a better option. For Adderall, breaking open the capsule over applesauce and ingesting with it is a viable option [R, R].

User Experiences

User reviews comparing Adderall and Vyvanse are slightly skewed because Adderall is usually the first medication prescribed. Therefore, Vyvanse is perceived as better for some people because it is prescribed in scenarios where Adderall fails.

Most patient experiences for Adderall tend to be positive, especially for treating narcolepsy and ADHD, which is not surprising due to the high effectiveness rates in clinical trials.

According to some users, school grade point averages went up following Adderall use. When comparing Adderall to Concerta, another stimulant, one user said that Adderall worked much better.

The difference in price also affects some users’ choices. Vyvanse is not available in a generic form and costs up to $8.84 a capsule. Adderall in its generic form can be purchased at $4.65 a capsule and at $7.60 a capsule for non-generic versions.

However, some people like Vyvanse as it is less physically intense and does not cause them to feel a sense of urgency while still increasing focus.

Some of the reviewers complain that Adderall causes strong, jittery feelings that keep them from doing work efficiently. Others complain that the initial onset of Adderall is too strong.

Critics of Vyvanse say it does not last them long enough throughout the day. Therefore, some people take Adderall in the early afternoon after taking Vyvanse in the morning.

FDA Compliance

The information on this website has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration or any other medical body. We do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition.

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